Book design is the art of incorporating the content, style, format, design, and sequence of the various components of a book into a coherent whole. In the words of Jan Tschichold, "methods and rules upon which it is impossible to improve, have been developed over centuries. To produce perfect books, these rules have to be brought back to life and applied." Front matter, or preliminaries, is the first section of a book, and is usually the smallest section in terms of the number of pages. Each page is counted, but no folio or page number is expressed, or printed, on either display pages or blank pages.

Simplicity involves unburdening your life, and living more lightly with fewer distractions that interfere with a high quality life, as defined uniquely by each individual.

To create and design an easily readable interface, you don’t need more than 40 font-sizes. A simple ratio-based scale with 8 options should suffice. Using the class extension namespaces you can set the font-size for any particular breakpoint that you desire.

Don’t spend time constantly overriding font-sizes in your css. If you don’t like a default font-size for an element, use the utilities to quickly make the text larger or smaller until it looks just right.

Typography has one plain duty before it and that is to convey information in writing. No argument or consideration can absolve typography from this duty. A printed work which cannot be read becomes a product without purpose.

Often times, websites devote a non-trivial amount of css to setting font-size. They declare an unnecessary amount of different font-sizes that upon inspection, don’t come close to resembling a sane type scale.

Measure refers to the length of a line of text. It is one of the most important aspects of readability. Anything from 45 to 75 characters is widely regarded as a satisfactory length of line for a single-column page… the 66-character line (counting both letters and spaces) is widely regarded as ideal. For multiple-column work, a better average is 40-50 characters.

Originally a strip of soft metal used for vertical spacing between lines of type. Now meaning the vertical distance from the baseline of one line to the baseline of the next. Also called leading.

Many people with cognitive disabilities have trouble tracking lines of text when a block of text is single spaced. Providing spacing between 1.5 to 2 allows them to start a new line more easily once they have finished the previous one.

Line-height affects how easy it is to read a piece of text, so having a well constructed set of values can help make your text easier to read, increasing the chances that people will read it. Shuffle provides classes to set text at three common line-height values. 1.5 for body copy, 1.25 for titles, and 1 for text that doesn’t wrap.

Spacing comes in two flavors. Depending on borders and background colors, the difference between padding and margin can be invisible to the naked eye of the user. But to a developer, they serve different roles. Most codebases lack a ratio based scale and instead are littered with values that are just magic numbers. This is bad.

Good design is based on math. Certain patterns and ratios are so prevelant in nature and music that they can't be denied as elegant design solutions. Even in the 18th century, pages in books were designed with ratios. In the 21st century, we have gotten away from this on the web, often using magic numbers to match a 'spec' that has been produced in a graphics program such as photoshop, illustrator, or sketch. While these programs are useful for sketching ideas, they aren't 100% accurate in their reflection of how the web works across device sizes or how things get drawn to the screen.

But I deal with this by meditating and by understanding I’ve been put on the planet to serve humanity. I have to remind myself to live simply and not overindulge, which is a constant battle in a material world.

There are two ways to be rich: One is by acquiring much, and the other is by desiring little.

— Jackie French Koller

Often times, websites devote a non-trivial amount of css to setting font-size. They declare an unnecessary amount of different font-sizes that upon inspection, don't come close to resembling a sane type scale.

To create and design an easily readable interface, you don't need more than 40 font-sizes. A simple ratio-based scale with 8 options should suffice. Using the class extension namespaces you can set the font-size for any particular breakpoint that you desire.

Don't spend time constantly overriding font-sizes in your css. If you don't like a default font-size for an element, use the utilities to quickly make the text larger or smaller until it looks just right.

Originally a strip of soft metal used for vertical spacing between lines of type. Now meaning the vertical distance from the baseline of one line to the baseline of the next. Also called leading.

"Many people with cognitive disabilities have trouble tracking lines of text when a block of text is single spaced. Providing spacing between 1.5 to 2 allows them to start a new line more easily once they have finished the previous one."

Line-height affects how easy it is to read a piece of text, so having a well constructed set of values can help make your text easier to read, increasing the chances that people will read it. Shuffle provides classes to set text at three common line-height values. 1.5 for body copy, 1.25 for titles, and 1 for text that doesn't wrap.

Single purpose classes to set the font-weight of any element at any breakpoint.

Varying the font-weight of different pieces of text can help create contrast between pieces of information. It can help call attention to a piece of content, or help to make a smaller font-size a bit more readable. In Elements of Typographic Style, Robert Bringhurst suggests we keep two things in mind when playing with font-weight. Use bold weights sparingly. Font-weight should decrease as font-size increases.

Spacing comes in two flavors. Depending on borders and background colors, the difference between padding and margin can be invisible to the naked eye of the user. But to a developer, they serve different roles. Most codebases lack a ratio based scale and instead are littered with values that are just magic numbers. This is bad.

Good design is based on math. Certain patterns and ratios are so prevelant in nature and music that they can't be denied as elegant design solutions. Even in the 18th century, pages in books were designed with ratios. In the 21st century, we have gotten away from this on the web, often using magic numbers to match a 'spec' that has been produced in a graphics program such as photoshop, illustrator, or sketch. While these programs are useful for sketching ideas, they aren't 100% accurate in their reflection of how the web works across device sizes or how things get drawn to the screen.

There are several pre-defined classes for setting the typeface of a page or element. It is suggested that you customize or extend this module to suit your own needs. As tachyons is a toolkit for designing performant webpages it comes with a variety of font stacks that utilize attractive system fonts with appropriate fallbacks.

All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.

Relying on systems fonts greatly improves page performance and can also help your web application/site blend in with the user's operating system. Readability is strongly linked to familiarity, so this helps create a more fluid reading experience, allowing your users to focus on your content.

A modular scale, like a musical scale, is a prearranged set of harmonious proportions.

Often times, websites devote a non-trivial amount of css to setting font-size. They declare an unnecessary amount of different font-sizes that upon inspection, don't come close to resembling a sane type scale. To create and design an easily readable interface, you don't need more than 40 font-sizes. A simple ratio-based scale with 8 options should suffice. Using the class extension namespaces you can set the font-size for any particular breakpoint that you desire.

Don't spend time constantly overriding font-sizes in your css. If you don't like a default font-size for an element, use the utilities to quickly make the text larger or smaller until it looks just right.

Don’t spend time constantly overriding font-sizes in your css. If you don’t like a default font-size for an element, use the utilities to quickly make the text larger or smaller until it looks just right.

The following analysis is intended to give a general idea of the contents of the museum in a classified form. It is based on catalogues in WEB and many of the figures are provisional. It must be emphasised that such an analysis bears no relation to the user’s attitude to this collection which is personal and empirical, little concerned with chronological classification and still less with balanced representation. It is thought, however, that this summary may be a useful guide to the present reader in search of specific material.

I'm a developer and artist from NYC. My work combines my passion for art, comedy, fashion, and design with my love of computers. Making interactive games is my hobby.

I've partnered with both large and small entities on a myriad of projects. I love working on new ideas and I'm always up for creating something fun.